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1.) Swamp Fox - 05/26/2015
Show off your handiwork, share your plans for world domination and ask all your Tool Time questions here.


I'll begin:

I have this in-line fuse holder lying around and am trying to figure out how to use it. The only experience I have with fuse holders is models where it's clear one end goes to the power and one goes to the electrical device, lol. ,,,I can't figure out the closed loop on this one. Are you supposed to cut it, strip the ends and then put connectors on and join it between your power cable and the battery?

Or use two of them with two fuses and link them back-to-back? LOL? lol




Also, this one is rated for 50 amps, I think. All I need is a 3 amp fuse. First, is a 3 amp fuse gonna even work in this, and second, do you need to match your fuse holder to your fuse and to your wire?

This little project is for a fishfinder. I've never messed with the in-line fuse "recommendation" on fishfinders before but now I'm thinking that's not too smart.

I'd also like to talk about a manual reset circuit breaker for a trolling motor. Never messed with those, either, but I just added to my trolling motor arsenal the other day and I will be very upset if I fry this one. I keep hearing how the circuit breaker is superior to an in-line fuse holder, so I'd even consider one for the fishfinder project (the two devices will often run off different power sources). My battery box for the trolling motors has a circuit breaker built in, but I don't want that to be the only thing I understand about circuit breakers.

So, throw all your marine electronics protection nowledge at me....


:grin:
2.) bluecat - 05/26/2015
Can you take that to an electronic supply house or at the very least one of the big box store chains and hopefully find someone that nos that stuff? Wish I did.
3.) Swamp Fox - 05/26/2015
You don't want to know how much time I spent talking to dummies at Lowe's, Home Depot and auto parts stores this weekend...Not about this specific thing, but I have another electrical mystery going on on top of this, LOL...

It's sad when I can figure out the guy in the electrical section doesn't know what I'm talking about when I know I sure do, isn't it? :wink :re::wink

At this point the auto parts guys will be my best bet on the part above. I may even have to drive to one of the boat places or to West Marine and get all my issues knocked out at once.
4.) Swamp Fox - 05/26/2015
That is, if the Brain Trust on this site doesn't come through for me...:fire:
5.) bluecat - 05/26/2015
I know, it's a crap shoot. Sometime you get those gems that are retired trade workers and are making some extra money at the big box stores and then sometimes you get a real dipwad.
6.) billy b - 05/26/2015
CUT IT & CRIMP IT professor!
7.) Swamp Fox - 05/26/2015
LOL...Very weird...I was just thinking of the "Professor" nickname the other day...Grammaw used to call me "the absent-minded professor"...One of her sons (my favorite uncle) was "Clumsy Ike.":-) She was a pistol...LOL



Why wouldn't it come with connections on two ends like you'd expect? :tap:
8.) Swamp Fox - 05/26/2015
BTW, my uncle's name wasn't Ike, LOL.

I never have figured out where "Clumsy Ike" comes from...Maybe a comic strip like "Boob McNutt" from the 19-teens and '20's? That would have been my grandmother's time :-) ...


[url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boob_McNutt[/url]


[I]Boob McNutt was a comic strip by Rube Goldberg which ran from 1915 to September 1934. It was syndicated by the McNaught Syndicate from 1922 until the end of its run.

Boob McNutt was a clumsy, buffoonish fellow who was quite friendly and attempted to be helpful in his incompetent way. He was entrusted with tasks like caring for priceless works of art and the Elixir of Immortality, tasks for which he inevitably failed, usually in a destructive manner.

From 1922 to 1926, the strip focused on Boob's pursuit of his true love Pearl, whom he finally married, then divorced, then married again and divorced again. [B]Goldberg inserted supporting characters from his other strips, including Mike and Ike (They Look Alike) and Bertha the Siberian Cheesehound. In 1934, he even brought in Professor Lucifer Gorgonzola Butts, inventor of those famed Rube Goldberg machines, for a brief sojourn before the strip was cancelled.
[/B]

[/I]
9.) bluecat - 05/26/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;32064]BTW, my uncle's name wasn't Ike, LOL.

I never have figured out where "Clumsy Ike" comes from...Maybe a comic strip like "Boob McNutt" from the 19-teens and '20's? That would have been my grandmother's time :-) ...


[url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boob_McNutt[/url]




[I]Boob McNutt was a comic strip by Rube Goldberg which ran from 1915 to September 1934. It was syndicated by the McNaught Syndicate from 1922 until the end of its run.

Boob McNutt was a clumsy, buffoonish fellow who was quite friendly and attempted to be helpful in his incompetent way. He was entrusted with tasks like caring for priceless works of art and the Elixir of Immortality, tasks for which he inevitably failed, usually in a destructive manner.

From 1922 to 1926, the strip focused on Boob's pursuit of his true love Pearl, whom he finally married, then divorced, then married again and divorced again. [B]Goldberg inserted supporting characters from his other strips, including Mike and Ike (They Look Alike) and Bertha the Siberian Cheesehound. In 1934, he even brought in Professor Lucifer Gorgonzola Butts, inventor of those famed Rube Goldberg machines, for a brief sojourn before the strip was cancelled.
[/B]

[/I][/QUOTE]

If she was a pistol then that would make him a son-of-a-gun.


I'll be here all week.
10.) Swamp Fox - 05/27/2015
So, I went up to the big city tonight to go to dinner with an old friend who was in town, and afterward when we said our goodbyes and went our separate ways, I had a few minutes to spare to scoot over to Bass Pro before they closed.

Although there were no master electricians available for me to talk to, one of the two young turks I did buttonhole was semi-helpful. As best we can tell, you're supposed to cut, strip and install connectors on the fuse holder shown above, although it's still the case that no one knows why. I left with a resupply of fuses, a couple of circuit breakers to play with for S&Gs, and some connectors in case I'm low on inventory in the Bronco.

I'm going in, boys...

If you hear on the news about any boat fires or small explosions over this way, shoot me a courtesy PM and I'll let you know what burn center I'm staying at as soon as I can type again...
11.) bluecat - 05/27/2015
12.) bluecat - 05/27/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;32077]So, I went up to the big city tonight to go to dinner with an old friend who was in town, and afterward when we said our goodbyes and went our separate ways, I had a few minutes to spare to scoot over to Bass Pro before they closed.

Although there were no master electricians available for me to talk to, one of the two young turks I did buttonhole was semi-helpful. As best we can tell, you're supposed to cut, strip and install connectors on the fuse holder shown above, although it's still the case that no one knows why. I left with a resupply of fuses, a couple of circuit breakers to play with for S&Gs, and some connectors in case I'm low on inventory in the Bronco.

I'm going in, boys...

If you hear on the news about any boat fires or small explosions over this way, shoot me a courtesy PM and I'll let you know what burn center I'm staying at as soon as I can type again...[/QUOTE]

You would think that if the way to use the item is to cut and strip it so it can be wired, it would already be cut and stripped and ready to wire. :cf:

Or at the very least a little instruction explaining all this.
13.) Swamp Fox - 05/27/2015
That's what I say...

The only thing I can think of is it's so it can be sold at a lower price point. Around $6.50 as opposed to 12 or 14 dollars...But in contrast, there are also three-dollar fuse holders out there that don't require a lot of DIY and deep contemplation...So I'm still scratching my head...
14.) Swamp Fox - 05/27/2015
I know Wild Bob has a crazy project or two he wants to show off...But in the meantime I'll throw this out:

I somehow broke the bottom to the better of my two battery boxes, and the top wouldn't mate to the bottom of the other one. Since the broken unit has a circuit breaker, a battery charge indicator and a cigarette lighter-type secondary receptacle built in, it's the one I prefer to use, so I was pretty upset with myself for breaking the better box. Since they want a minimum of $35 for a new box of this model (with most at $42 or more) and all I need is the bottom, I thought I'd try to figure something out.

Lo and behold, a Roughneck storage container I happened to have two of just lying around preserving old bills fits my Interstate Group 27 deep cycle battery like a glove, and more importantly is a PERFECT fit for the battery box well on my little creek boats. Not all Roughneck boxes fit, even ones that look similar at a quick glance, so I really lucked out. Naturally, I can't find any more of these to hoard for a battery box emergency in the future :bang: but I guess I should be thankful I snatched up two when I did.

This is not the exact box, but you get the idea (I'm speaking of the medium or largest size pictured here---hard to tell--- roughly 10 gallons maybe?). The finished set-up winds up to be 2-4 inches taller than a regular battery box, especially when I double up on the containers (see below) but no biggie:



I nested two together to protect the inner container from UV rays somewhat, and I figured doubling up on everything would minimize the chances of the handles or bottom weathering and dropping a 50-pound battery on my foot, since I do have to move this battery around almost daily, rather than let it sit in a boat all the time.

I doubled up on the lids to add some strength as well, drilled some holes in the old battery box top, and mated them to holes I drilled in the Roughneck tops. I came within five pubes of getting all four sets of holes lined up perfectly through three pieces of plastic, only two of which could be drilled together, which is pretty impressive for me, if I do say so myself.:wink

So, the top of this battery box (see below) mated to the Roughneck lids, which are then set on the Roughneck bottom. Everything is finally secured with the usual battery box strap. (Actually it's an old treestand waist belt to handle the extra height of my design. An old treestand strap with appropriate buckles would work as well---Always save all your old straps and webbing, LOL)

Obviously I drilled holes in the Roughneck tops to run the battery box wires down through, and "waterproofed" them with rubber grommets. I haven't dunked the box or been out in a downpour with it yet, but it seems like it will be pretty watertight to me.

I think I have maybe 10 or 12 dollars in the Roughnecks and maybe six or eight dollars (probably less) in stainless steel hardware and rubber grommets, plus my time. If it weren't for the time, it would beat spending $35 on a new battery box like a rented mule. But I can put the $35 to something more fun, like ammunition or a reciprocating saw, so all in all it was well worth it. Ask me again next time I count my fingers. :-)


15.) bluecat - 05/27/2015
Nice job McSwamper!
16.) Wild Bob - 05/27/2015
Man, you are on a roll!

Keep 'em coming...

I'm a bit scuddled on any projects at the moment. Work has been busy and unfortunately over bearing, so I'm trying really hard to not be grumpy like Luv2. :-)

I wanna see pictures of your boat in action. :tu:
17.) Swamp Fox - 05/27/2015
I'll see what I can do...The next week or so I'm back in deer season preparation mode, but I'll try to get some pics next time I'm on the water or at least have a good "dry dock" opportunity, LOL.
18.) bluecat - 05/28/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;32121]I'll see what I can do...The next week or so I'm back in deer season preparation mode, but I'll try to get some pics next time I'm on the water or at least have a good "dry dock" opportunity, LOL.[/QUOTE]

Do you alphabetize your preparation modes?
19.) Swamp Fox - 05/28/2015
Naw...I use one of those old tumblers you fill up with marked ping pong balls or slips of paper and crank by hand....Whatever comes up is what I do...Between that and always heeding the advice of my Magic 8 Ball, it keeps my life interesting...So I've got that going for me. :wink
20.) bluecat - 05/28/2015
DP is back and I'm all out of strippers and silly string.
21.) Hunter - 05/28/2015
Swampy, I thought your boat sunk or something like that? :wave:
22.) Jon - 05/28/2015
Swamp thing, I'm assuming these battery boxes that you have fabbed are being used on a boat? If'n I was you, since there's no such thing as waterproof when it comes to a boat, I'd drill drain holes in the bottom of those boxes because water in and no water out means 2 things...... a really heavy battery box and/or a battery under water.
23.) Swamp Fox - 05/28/2015
[QUOTE=Hunter;32148]Swampy, I thought your boat sunk or something like that? :wave:[/QUOTE]

You're thinking of the series of unfortunate accidents that have dumped all my firearms to the bottom of various lakes and rivers across the country. While all the guns are gone, I've managed to save all the canoes and small boats. I credit floatation foam and air pockets, but I really should be more careful...Some day my luck will run out...


:wave:
24.) bluecat - 05/28/2015
:re::re:
25.) Swamp Fox - 05/28/2015
[QUOTE=Jon;32150]Swamp thing, I'm assuming these battery boxes that you have fabbed are being used on a boat? If'n I was you, since there's no such thing as waterproof when it comes to a boat, I'd drill drain holes in the bottom of those boxes because water in and no water out means 2 things...... a really heavy battery box and/or a battery under water.[/QUOTE]


I go back and forth on this. You are certainly right that there is no such thing as waterproof on a boat, but at the same time I don't like the idea of a battery box with holes on the bottom that might sit on a flat deck sometimes (standing water). But the alternative is a battery that sits in water at the bottom of the box (if water gets in) so there's no clear winner. I probably will wind up drilling some drain holes and putting the box up on some small slats where/whenever a "well" or deck area is flat or near-flat.

I always wondered why every off-the-shelf battery box I've ever come across wasn't built to drain, but I suppose that's because batteries don't always go in wells that have raised platforms. I don't know---how hard is to find a couple of pieces of 2x4?
26.) Jon - 05/28/2015
In my job, we have battled with the waterproof vs drainage mentality since day 1. Antenna mounts on the belly of an aircraft are prime example. The connectors are perfect gatherers of mousture and since they are on the mount of the antenna which is the top when it's mounted facing down, it is the easy way for water to get inside the mast. Not a big deal you say? Well, at 30,000', even in the summer, it is 40 deg below zero or so and moisture freezing inside an antenna makes it do funny things.
drain holes win every time because moisture is going to get in.
Anyway, a battery is a sealed unit so it doesn't need to be bone dry inside it's case.
27.) Swamp Fox - 05/28/2015
[QUOTE=Jon;32154]...drain holes win every time because moisture is going to get in.
Anyway, a battery is a sealed unit so it doesn't need to be bone dry inside it's case.[/QUOTE]

That makes sense...I have bigger problems if enough water to worry about gets in my battery box, but I do think I lean to the side of having even small amounts self-drain rather than having to think about it myself.

I did drill drain holes in the inner bucket of the two nested cat-litter buckets I use for my anchor and anchor rope, cast net, etc. I thought that was pretty swift. :wink I can throw the anchor, anchor rope, wet wading shoes , wet rags, etc. in there and they're not sitting in water all night even if I'm too lazy to empty the bucket and lay everything out to dry when I get home.

Those Tidy Cat buckets are pretty damn handy, by the way. Watertight lids, and at least two useful sizes. I've seen them mounted on tractors etc. to carry tools or drinks or what have you. The other day I even saw them mounted in pairs as panniers on the back of a couple of bicycles.

28.) Swamp Fox - 06/11/2015
I've wound up with an old set of two 16-inch spoked wheels, an old axle (I think 20 inches. maybe 18) and a 2-foot threaded rod (axle material) in the aftermath of souping up one of my deer carts and building a couple of boat carts.

I thought of using the longer rod and wheels to build a gear hauler/deer cart for a satellite branch of Camp Swanpy, since I don't have anything at that location. The idea would be that this one would have a basket or something, not just two rails and some crosspieces. Ideally, you could use it to haul a deer, or throw a treestand or large cooler, tools and miscellaneous implements of destruction in it as you forge the world to your liking. I was thinking of something sturdier than a Little Red Wagon, maybe some type of garden cart or steel/aluminum grate basket or cargo box. Maybe something store-bought that I can strip of unsuitable wheels, etc.

Any ideas?

I'm not opposed to a project that would require a 36-inch rod; I just thought since I had this two-footer hanging around I'd see if I could put it to use.
29.) bluecat - 06/11/2015
If I were to improve upon commercially available deer carts I would put some foldable sides on them so they could easily hold loose items like deer stands etc. I use my deer cart for a lot more than just hauling deer.
When you start piling stuff in them the stuff just slides around.
30.) Swamp Fox - 06/11/2015
That's why I want to do this. Not only could I use a deer cart at this location, but I would like something to haul fishing gear, tools, stands, etc. anyway.

If this weren't 55 inches long and just over $100, I'd play with this in a heartbeat. Water trough, 55 L 27 W 18 H...





Maybe 2/3 that length and half that price would be cool.
31.) bluecat - 06/11/2015
Hmm, now you got me thinking. What is the price of the replacement wheel barrow containers. Or here's an idea. You know those 55 gallon blue drums? You can pick those things up for cheap. I've got one in my basement full of drinking water that I picked up for 12.00 on Craig's List. Cut it in half lengthwise and now you have two. Or only remove part of the top for deeper sides. Bolt it to a frame. Would that work?
32.) crookedeye - 06/11/2015
once you get the blue drum attached to youre cart you can start pipping it out..maybe some red reflectors in the back , one of those license plate holders, cup holder.. the possibilitys are endless..maybe some camo racing stripes...
33.) Swamp Fox - 06/11/2015
That's a great idea. Also never thought of a replacement "barrow"---I guess that's what a wheel barrow is without any wheels, LOL...

Ideally the thing wouldn't be metal so as to prevent noise and rust, but that's being picky at this stage. I know there are smaller water troughs than the one above, but the ones I know of are oval..Sure would like to find something with a flat bottom and more of a rectangle.

A cheap-o car cargo hitch rack, maybe...
34.) bluecat - 06/11/2015
The replacement barrow and blue drums are all heavy gauge poly. No rust.
35.) Swamp Fox - 06/11/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;32523]That's a great idea...[/QUOTE]


That was directed at Bluecat...LOL


:wink

:wave: CE!
36.) Swamp Fox - 06/11/2015
Can I find a barrow that's long enough for a deer (shoulders and hams)?
37.) bluecat - 06/12/2015
It depends whether you have quartered it out or not. I think if the deer was quartered you wouldn't have a problem. The picture below is what I'm talking about except my wheelbarrow is blue. The drum idea I think would give you the same amount of room with steeper sides for a lot less money.

38.) bluecat - 06/12/2015
The drum would be easier to get through trees as it isn't as wide. If you cut the top 1/3 off the drum and do it cleanly you may be able to make a hinge so your traveling side show could be protected from the elements as well. Just shooting from the hip.
39.) Swamp Fox - 06/12/2015
I like the hinge idea...like a pig cooker, LOL...

I could use a tarp to keep things dry, but I'd lose the ability to cook barbeque in remote locations....:tap::wink:-)

I could quarter stuff (and maybe this would be a better system than packing it out on my back, where you can't get all your gear out in one trip if you're talking stand, etc as well as the usual stuff) but I know nobody else who might use the cart will quarter in the field. They all want to take the deer out whole and deal with it later.

I'm thinking rickshaw or t-handle cart might be a possibility to get a longer cargo box. I'm liking the barrel idea, and the only problem with the wheel barrow tub idea is the shape of the tub...
40.) bluecat - 06/12/2015
I understand about the shape of the tub. It isn't really conducive to what you need. I like my mag hauler as it holds a lot of stuff. The problem is that it doesn't have sides per say so stuff can flop out. I solved that last year by getting a HUGE army duffle. Pretty much anything can go in the duffle without flopping out. It also protects things as you go through brush.
41.) bluecat - 06/12/2015
About the deer. I don't understand why people mess with trying to get a whole deer out when you can quarter one out in short order and really make things easy on yourself.
42.) Swamp Fox - 06/12/2015
I've got my team scouring scrap piles, sheds and behind neighbor houses for frame and "'box" materials...Over the next 30 or 60 days, I'm gonna try to be nicer to the guys who can weld and aren't afraid of having a serious grinder accident, in case it comes down to that. LOL
43.) Deerminator - 06/12/2015
I think there were some old rules about proving it was a buck to the state, not an illegally killed doe.

It wasn't all that long ago when NYS hunters had to apply for a party permit in order to legally take a doe.
The party permit needed up to 5 hunters to share one doe.
44.) bluecat - 06/12/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;32539]I've got my team scouring scrap piles, sheds and behind neighbor houses for frame and "'box" materials...Over the next 30 or 60 days, I'm gonna try to be nicer to the guys who can weld and aren't afraid of having a serious grinder accident, in case it comes down to that. LOL[/QUOTE]

LOL!
45.) bluecat - 06/12/2015


After constantly trying to keep things in the cart I got the duffel. I can get stand, steps, pack, clothes, etc. in the one duffle. I generally carry the bow on my back.
46.) Swamp Fox - 06/12/2015
[QUOTE=bluecat;32537]About the deer. I don't understand why people mess with trying to get a whole deer out when you can quarter one out in short order and really make things easy on yourself.[/QUOTE]

Two words:

Four-wheelers and beer...Though that might be three or four words...

A lot of guys like to hang the deer to gut it and won't try to hang it in the field.

Another group likes to take the deer whole to the processor and pay an extra $20 for somebody else to dress the deer.

And another group might have a requirement that deer they kill must be weighed before processing.

All three groups like to drink beer rather than cut up animals in the woods, LOL.
47.) Swamp Fox - 06/12/2015
[QUOTE=Deerminator;32540]I think there were some old rules about proving it was a buck to the state, not an illegally killed doe.

[/QUOTE]


That's true too. Forgot about that one. Without getting into the weeds and the fine print, SC likes the head to stay on the deer and NC is only a bit more lenient.
48.) bluecat - 06/12/2015
I'm usually so ecstatic that I finally got a deer, I welcome the opportunity to play with my cutlery. LOL!
49.) Swamp Fox - 06/12/2015
I know the feeling!
50.) Swamp Fox - 06/18/2015
I got a lead over the weekend on a place that might have some pickle/pickling barrels to sell me for my cart project. You might even be able to make feeder barrels out of them...I'll have to look at 'em to see what the bottoms look like, and you'd need to build some type of stand to get them off the ground. Some barrels at this place are plastic and others are metal.

Anyhoo, if you have any meat processing or pickling plants near you, give them a shot.

Here's the general idea:

[url]http://www.lexingtoncontainercompany.com/Olive---Pickle-Barrels.html[/url]
51.) bluecat - 06/18/2015
Interesting. I've never seen barrels quite like that before. I'm sure you can get them to work.

This is what I picked up.



I'm going to make a couple of rain barrels for the garden that get water from the roof of the house. I picked up two barrels for 24.00. Keep me posted on your project.
52.) Swamp Fox - 06/18/2015
Another idea is restaurants or restaurant supply places that might have or use syrup or cooking oil in drums. I have a smallish (maybe 30 gallon) syrup barrel at Camp Swampy that's been waiting to be turned into a shower/cleaning water reservoir whenever I get around to it. :re::tap::bang:
53.) Swamp Fox - 06/18/2015
Where did your barrels come from before they were on Craigslist?
54.) Swamp Fox - 06/18/2015



55.) bluecat - 06/18/2015
They came from a guy who worked at a nearby food plant. The barrels had some sort of emulcifier in it. It was a chemical additive but it was a non-toxic type of additive.


Nice rack! :wink
56.) Wild Bob - 06/19/2015
Nice! great way to put that rain water to use.
57.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
I just found some pickle barrels for $15 a piece that I can put my hands on without a lot of fuss...I still want to talk to my other source if I can get around to it, but it's a bigger to-do to catch them at the right time with barrels to spare.

I might need one to replace a leaky (?) feeder barrel (not one of yours, Hunter; another guy's that I've adopted---all the barrels got attention/repair this summer, but this one had water come out when I filled it with corn and spun the motor....I don't know where the water was before that because it looked dry when I first rolled up to it (couldn't look inside the barrel, though).

Maybe it was just a lot of condensation? Metal barrel, tight lid, hot sun, mid-morning? Doesn't make a lot of sense to me, but neither does rolling up to a dry motor, doing a test spin, everything looks A-OK, and then seeing water drip out after filling with corn and doing a second test spin.:bang:

The pickle barrels are sturdy and heavy plastic, but I don't know how I'm gonna affix one to a cart frame once I cut it lengthwise, being rounded and all. I'm starting to lean toward the wheelbarrow tub idea for simplicity on that project, just to get it out of my hair, LOL.
58.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
Okay, also for your consideration: I want to build a bracket to put a cargo basket on a boat trailer tongue. Since I can't find anything ready-made for that purpose (not a tongue basket roughly 20x30 in. anyway) I have two options: 1) buy a cheap receiver hitch cargo basket (20 x 48) and bolt it on using its own stem (riding on top of the trailer tongue, secured by square u-bolts, or 2) use a bigger basket I already have (25 x 53) that I would need to fabricate a bolting platform for. It too would ride/bolt on the top of the tongue with u-bolts (haven't really considered if affixing to the side somehow is more secure) but it would have "wings" that would extend out on each side to bolt to original-equipment plates welded to the bottom of the basket, on each side of the center line of the bracket. So what I have available to me via the original equipment plates is: Two bolt holes each at top right, bottom right, bottom left and top left of my "platform area".

Thus, my contraption would look like the letter "I" with a wingspan for each crosspiece of [COLOR="#FF0000"]22 [/COLOR]inches [edit from original] and a stem length to ride on the tongue of at least 18 inches.

I have a buddy who thinks he possibly maybe might can get somebody to consider talking about making this for me, but he hasn't seen the basket and we've only talked on the phone so I'm not sure we're on the same page. I don't follow him too well sometimes, anyway, LOL. I think he's talking about welding angle iron to the top and bottom of the stem, whereas I was originally thinking of just welding wings across it. I'd like to have fairly wide wings so as to use the two bolt holes available at each corner (I'd say holes are approx. 2. 25 inches apart, center-hole to center-hole.) I'm sure someone will eventually ask why not just weld wings to the tongue directly, and that's a fair question. Other than I probably don't want a permanent fixture to bang my knees into all the time when the basket's off, why not?

Also, after all this work designing and fabricating for the bigger basket (which I probably don't need except maybe for camping) I probably have to watch how I jackknife the trailer, LOL. I think this would be a smaller concern with a smaller basket, but then again, I already have the big basket and I kinda like $85 for other things rather than more baskets. I mean, I can only use one at a time, LOL.

Here's a pic of the basket I have, except this is the older style and doesn't show the bolting plates properly. As mentioned above, I have 8 bolt holes to work with, as opposed to the pictured 4. Also, the crosspieces running between the bolting plates have been eliminated, while the plates themselves have been made much wider and beefier.





Tell me your thoughts and also if you envision any road hazards waiting to happen if I follow any of my plans, LOL. If anybody sees me having problems getting the appropriate/proper materials together, I'd want to know that as well.

I know absolutely nothing about welding, by the way, in case you didn't know that. :wink Trailer tongue is galvanized aluminum with a width across the flat of 2 inches. Both baskets in contention are steel. I haven't considered drilling bolt holes for anything into the tongue itself at all. Should I?
59.) bluecat - 08/04/2015
I guess I'd have to see the basket in position to determine if it would impede on your turning freedom. I don't think I would drill into the tongue as it might weaken it slightly and could also affect any resale value. What sort of things are you putting in the basket anyway? Snorkels, swim fins, water wings? LOL!
60.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
The trailer has a long tongue to begin with, so the ladies really like it when I roll up to the boat ramp. Even if it didn't, chicks dig a jonboat, which happens to be the title of my first book. My second book will be [I]Chicks REALLY Dig a Fishing Kayak[/I], by the way.

But I digress. I might put a winch on the tongue and the basket forward of that, which with the widest basket would still leave 30-33 inches perhaps between the basket's leadind edge and the centerline of the ball. I do have a rear-mounted tire, though. Hmmm...So anyway, put that in your pipe and smoke it. I might be cutting it close. Maybe not. But I think I'd like to have a smaller basket than a bigger one. I just can't find one. The basket is mainly for a cooler. I need 20 x 30 inches, roughly. If I camp with the trailer I can find other uses where a bigger basket might be helpful.

This whole thing might come down to how easy is it to get certain sizes of u-bolts. If I can't find 2-inch wide and maybe 6 or 8-inch long U's, I might HAVE to bolt to the side of the tongue where gap and length would be in line with what I think I mostly see on the shelves when wandering around Home Depot. Also, would like my hardware to be stainless steel, but that's not a deal breaker.
61.) Jon - 08/04/2015
Lets do an experiment, start a new thread titled "Swampy's completed DIY Projects". I'll take the over/under at 1 post............ :bang:
62.) bluecat - 08/04/2015
Dang, Jon came strong out of the gate. :wink
63.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
:-)

I'm about done with my battery box...LOL

Technically, it still needs to be painted for UV protection, but otherwise.... :wink

I went back and added a beefed-up circuit breaker and added a rail to the top to mount a spotlight on a Ram ball...pretty cool, but I had to take the box apart to do all that...but on the plus side now it's ready and waiting for the Rustoleum... LOL.


Lots of other things put to bed...beefed up a deer cart, built two kayak dollies (sp?) --one a prototype portable version with swivel wheels which I think is gonna be killer---refurbished a bunch of treestands, jerry-rigged a cargo box for the fishing Bronco, attached rod holders to nearly every vertical surface I could find ....I'm sure I'm leaving something out...


Maybe in a few weeks I'll put everything up here in a thread called "What I Did On My Summer Vacation"....:grin:
64.) Deerminator - 08/04/2015
Do much trolling out of the Bronco?
65.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
You'd be surprised...Run it through the car wash, comb my hair and check my breath...Good things can happen...LOL
66.) crookedeye - 08/04/2015
comb youre hair?? do they even make combs anymore..lol..
67.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
I know a few people around here who haven't needed a comb in years...LOL...

Have we ever seen you without a hat on? Floyd wants to know.

:wink

:-)
68.) Jon - 08/04/2015
So, we're really expected to believe you without pictures of any of these "completed" DIY projects?
69.) Deerminator - 08/04/2015
:wl:
70.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
[QUOTE=Jon;33561]So, we're really expected to believe you without pictures of any of these "completed" DIY projects?[/QUOTE]


LOL... Let me see what I can do about that in the next few days. I hope photobucket doesn't give me a conniption...I'm dreading the prospect already...In other, somewhat related news, I might be getting closer to getting a smartphone, LOL
71.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
In the meantime, I know I'm not the only one puttering around McGyvering stuff...


:tap:

:fire:
72.) Triton Rich - 08/04/2015
[B]I've got an apple macbook air completely disassembled on my computer desk right now, does that count as a DIY project? [/B]
73.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
It depends...Are you scrounging for parts for something, challenging yourself to put it back together, or seeing if you can make it work better?

:pop::pop:
74.) Triton Rich - 08/04/2015
[B]Well it'll definitely be a challenge to get it back together! A couple years ago, the wifey spilled coffee on her work laptop. The IT department said it would be too expensive to fix so she was given a new one. It's been laying around ever since. Now my daughter has been asking for a laptop. I did some googling and it seems that a liquid spill on this model often only ruins the keyboard itself. We got permission from her boss to keep it if I can fix it so I ordered a keyboard for 25 bucks on ebay and I'm in the process of replacing it. Stupid me, I missed the part in a youtube video that says you need to buy screws to replace the rivets that fly everywhere when you rip out the old keyboard so now I'm waiting on a $5 bag of screws that I paid $25 to express mail here so I can hopefully have it fixed in time for my little girl's birthday next week![/B]
75.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
:-)

Still, $30 for a laptop for your girl's birthday is money well spent.

I've heard God does not deduct from your life the time you spend working on computers...

No, wait, that's [I]fishing...[/I]



Sorry for the mix-up, LOL...
76.) Triton Rich - 08/04/2015
[B] I'm pretty sure I deducted some time from my life taking it apart. Man, they make some tiny connectors![/B]
77.) Hunter - 08/04/2015
My bow may turn into a DIY project
78.) Swamp Fox - 08/04/2015
LOL...

Both of y'all keep us posted...
79.) Swamp Fox - 08/05/2015
Use it as is, or take the DIY Challenge and build a rolling frame for it?

Seems like this might beat the barrow tub and the sawed-off pickle barrel ideas...

They sell runners/guards with watertight attachment for the bottom if you want to drag it on rough ground.


In black or pay a little extra for camo...Priced attractively.







[url]http://www.shappell.com/sleds.html[/url]



[url]http://www.shappell.com/jetsledaccspp.html[/url]
80.) luv2bowhunt - 08/06/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;33600]Use it as is, or take the DIY Challenge and build a rolling frame for it?[/QUOTE]

Umm, I already have one of those with a rolling frame. It's called a wheel barrel. You'd play the devil using that thing where I hunt.
81.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
Well, I wouldn't use it where you hunt....:wink :bk: :wink
82.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
Unless you provide GPS coordinates, suggest a few good restaurants, and line up a date for me...Maybe...I'd consider it, anyway...
83.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
I don't know...I still probably wouldn't hunt where you hunt...It depends on a lot of things...:wink :wave:
84.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
[QUOTE=luv2bowhunt;33616]Umm, I already have one of those with a rolling frame. It's called a wheel barrel. [/QUOTE]


I'd use two big wide-spaced wheels and cable hand brakes to them if using it in steep country...Nearly did that with one of my old carts. But I think my days humping around in the mountains anymore are not many, going forward, so I never got around to it.
85.) bluecat - 08/06/2015
I hear the air is thinner, the mountains are higher, the snow is deeper and the vegetation is thicker in Pennsylvania. Why would anyone want to hunt there?
86.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
Because you get to walk to school uphill, both ways?


:-)
87.) Wild Bob - 08/06/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;33600]Use it as is, or take the DIY Challenge and build a rolling frame for it?

Seems like this might beat the barrow tub and the sawed-off pickle barrel ideas...

They sell runners/guards with watertight attachment for the bottom if you want to drag it on rough ground.


In black or pay a little extra for camo...Priced attractively.







[url]http://www.shappell.com/sleds.html[/url]



[url]http://www.shappell.com/jetsledaccspp.html[/url][/QUOTE]

I have an Otter Sled (very similar to this) that I use once in a while for hunting, and use all the time for ice fishing. I don't have a frame on mine, but I did fabricate a clamp plate apparatus to stiffen up the point where the pull rope attaches - that is effort well spent IMO.

I reality though - 8 times out of 10, as far as deer hunting goes, if there is snow on the ground...if Iím close enough to the rig to a deer drag; then I'll just drag the deer out on its own on the snow. (Doesn't seem like a trip back to the rig empty just to get the sled to turn around and drag the deer out on the sled is worth the extra trip. Also, I've found that dragging a load in that sled vs. just dragging a deer on its own (especially down) over hills is a challenge. (I don't guess I've figured out the art of jumping on the sled, on top of a dead deer and riding the whole shoot and caboodle down a hill successfully yet...:lol:)

In regards to elk, I suppose the sled would be great for hauling quarters out as opposed to the old back...but I've not been blessed yet with the experience of downing an elk in the snow. But again, I imagine going down hill would be a challenge.

If no snow and I am in a place where I can get a deer out whole...I use a game cart.
88.) Wild Bob - 08/06/2015
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;33621]I'd use two big wide-spaced wheels and cable hand brakes to them if using it in steep country...Nearly did that with one of my old carts. But I think my days humping around in the mountains anymore are not many, going forward, so I never got around to it.[/QUOTE]

Your not that old...quit crying the old age card. :-)
89.) luv2bowhunt - 08/06/2015
Yeah anyway, you ain't that old.

Seriously though, what advantage has the tub over a standard cart? I've never had a problem getting a deer or a stand to haul on a standard cart. Not seeing a real advantage in that or worse yet the effort of modifying it.

Or in your case, the effort in thinking about modifying it.:wink
90.) Wild Bob - 08/06/2015
I don't know, honestly...every year I load up the game cart in the truck and sometimes the sled when there is snow on the ground. And for various reasons it seems like I almost always end up getting critters out the basic ways of drag line or quatering and packing (if I'm far from the rig). It often seems like using the other means adds work on some level, such as trip back to the rig just to get it - and I hate making what feels like a usless trip!

Normally, my method of getting a deer out of where I'm hunting entails quartering and packing it out in my trusty old pack frame, as you can see here. (I wonder if that has anything to do with 2 back surgeries over the years... :cf: )



[URL=http://s763.photobucket.com/user/WildBob_2009/media/09_mulie.jpg.html][/URL]
91.) luv2bowhunt - 08/06/2015
[QUOTE=bluecat;33622]I hear the air is thinner, the mountains are higher, the snow is deeper and the vegetation is thicker in Pennsylvania. Why would anyone want to hunt there?[/QUOTE]

I wouldn't hunt here if I didn't have to. Well, I would, but it would be nice to hunt where you see deer everyday.
92.) Wild Bob - 08/06/2015
AAAhhh, seeing deer every day would be like living with a super model every day...after a while it'd get boring.

I think...


:-)
93.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
LOL...

I'm not that old but I think my bones must have gotten here about 20 years before I did...LOL...I've had knee problems for a while and lately my right hip is giving me a fit. I had to cut way back on the backpacking a while ago, my legs went to hell when I had to quit playing bassetball, and who knows where the hip pain and stiffness comes from, but it ain't good for walking off trail whether packed or in my birthday suit. Hell, a one-hour car ride or riding my desk for too long has me gimping around like Billy's grandpappy...:wink:wave:
94.) luv2bowhunt - 08/06/2015
You need to go to boot camp with Kenny. No wonder he quit taking you along, you must've been a huge burden.

I guess this means the Blue-Gray VA mountain camp extravaganza is a no go for 2015 then.
95.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
Carts don't do too well in mud or very soft ground, thus the alternatives.


I've used an open sled for years and posted about it. When you don't have room/time/terrain for a cart, they do pretty well. The one I use is called the Dead Sled, and then I bought what's essentially a VERY heavy-duty tarp last year. I wanted something very compact. Posted about that too but forget the name of it. I didn't have a chance to test drive it last year, but I expect to this year.

The tub would help hold things in, like tools and stands and fishing gear, etc.. They're more outdoorsman-friendly in their shape than a barrow tub, so I think that's a big plus.
96.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
[QUOTE=luv2bowhunt;33635]You need to go to boot camp with Kenny. No wonder he quit taking you along, you must've been a huge burden.

I guess this means the Blue-Gray VA mountain camp extravaganza is a no go for 2015 then.[/QUOTE]


LOL...

Things could change if I can find some packhorses...
97.) bluecat - 08/06/2015
[QUOTE=Wild Bob;33633]AAAhhh, seeing deer every day would be like living with a super model every day...after a while it'd get boring.

I think...


:-)[/QUOTE]


No it wouldn't.
98.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
LOL...

No it wouldn't be like living with a supermodel, or no, living with a supermodel wouldn't get boring?

I guess you could choose "both."


There's another problem with the supermodel comparison: There aren't any proverbs along the lines of "No matter how hot a deer is, some guy somewhere is tired of her $#!+"


:wink
99.) bluecat - 08/06/2015
Living with a super model would never be boring. I would never get tired of her $#!+. :wink
100.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
I lived with two super models for a while...


One was the Batmobile, and it had a buzzsaw that sprung out of the front when you mashed a little latch on the hood....Also orange flames shot out the tailpipe and little plastic rockets from the door-mounted cannons...

The other was the Green Lantern's car, which seems to me now to have been some type of Lincoln Continental, or at least some type of old black sedan you see mob guys or the Blues Brothers driving in the movies...It was cool at the time for some reason...

So about 1969 was the last time I had any real contact with anything like a super model...


LOL
101.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015



Corgi made this one...And I stand corrected: the cannons were on the trunk, not the doors.
102.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
More corrections: It was the Green Hornet, not the Green Lantern...Well, duh...LOL


Cannons in the front grill on this one. :grin:








And look at the cannons on this one! Too bad you can't see them better...:grin:



103.) Wild Bob - 08/06/2015
Come-on now! ~ We were talking game retrieval, how did it end up here.

There is no hope. :bk:
104.) bluecat - 08/06/2015
I think if I remember correctly when the tires moved on that batmobile the flames went in and out. Coolest car ever.
105.) Swamp Fox - 08/06/2015
Exactly!


Wild Bob, you were the one who dragged super models into this...


:nk:
106.) Swamp Fox - 08/16/2016
I had to buy some weed-eater line the other day and was reminded of this project. Although it comes from the kayak fishing world, I figured there are several hunting applications as well. I can think of these as rangefinder leashes, call leashes, phone leashes, etc. (I think you could simply attach a loop or clip to the proper kind of phone holster's spring clip. I'm also thinking of Fastex buckles or some type of self-adhesive bracket such as are used on action cameras, etc., which would be affixed to a phone's protective case. Let me know if you all have any ideas along this line.)

FYI, the paracord cover isn't necessary but a lot of people use it. My guess is that it does add a little protection to gear and from UV rays, but it may also be mostly decorative, since you can't find weedeater line in a bazillion colors the way you can paracord. (Reflective paracord would be handy in some cases here, I have to say.)

Stick through the whole video to see the importance and technique of reversing the coil. Unfortunately, I don't think some leashes you can buy commercially are as tight as the end result here, so this is one of those rare cases that a SIMPLE home project may give you something BETTER than what you can buy off the shelf.


:beer:

107.) bluecat - 08/16/2016
That is pretty slick.
108.) Jon - 08/16/2016
That's easy to do and very handy to have, thanks for the video
109.) Swamp Fox - 08/16/2016
Glad it's useful. :p
110.) Jon - 08/17/2016
Not hunting related at all but this was useful to me.
The wife wanted some shelves built in the basement, we needed more storage and the basement was getting cluttered. I searched for ideas and found a really simple plan.
We wanted 2-16' shelves that are 2' deep. First step, screw 16' (or 2, 8') 2x4's into the wall where you want the shelves to be. (we wanted them to have 27" between)
[URL=http://s93.photobucket.com/user/jonnybow/media/received_1224583627566383.jpeg.html][/URL]

Then, screw 2 more 16' 2x4's into those, directly over the top BUT only screw them in partially, just enough to hold them in place (and don't screw them in at the ends where side supports will be). Once that is complete, screw the leg supports into the 2nd set of 2x4's (use 2.5" screws so you don't go through both sets of 2x4's) and remove the screws holding the 16' 2x4's together. Now you'll have identical height supports. Now, depending on how deep you want your shelves to be, cut the support braces that will be holding the plywood for shelving. I cut 10 sections of 21" 2x4's because we wanted 2' deep shelves. (made it simple since plywood comes in 4x8 sheets so I just ripped them in half) and install them between the 2 halves, it should look like this.
[URL=http://s93.photobucket.com/user/jonnybow/media/received_1224583650899714.jpeg.html][/URL]

Now, all you have to do is cut your plywood and lay it in place and screw it down. Izzie approved
[URL=http://s93.photobucket.com/user/jonnybow/media/20160813_150707.jpg.html][/URL]

This project cost $68 at Lowe's including a 1lb box of 2.5" screws, it took me 1 hour to complete with very little help from the wife and saved me allot of headache hearing the nagging about cleaning up the basement storage room.
111.) Swamp Fox - 08/17/2016
Did you know you have a skunk in your garage?

Or something...LOL
112.) Swamp Fox - 08/17/2016
I've studied it, and I like it. :applause:

I think I even follow the duplication of supports. Simple idea, but I probably wouldn't have thought of it, LOL.


Did you attach the side support to the wall studs or just to the 2x4's attached to the wall? If so, how?


Whenever I think of taking on a carpentry project, I imagine it turning out like Little Bill's cabin in [I]Unforgiven[/I]. :wink
113.) Jon - 08/17/2016
The 2x4's are screwed to the studs and the end caps (side supports) are screwed into the 2x4's with 2.5" deck screws.

That's my 15lb Boston Terrier, Izzie
114.) Swamp Fox - 08/17/2016
Thanks. I've seen this doo-hickey on TV that helps you make really pretty angled anchors, but all I have experience with is banging or drilling angled stuff in a very unfancy manner.
115.) Jon - 08/17/2016
You don't need that fancy doo-hickey but it would help if you are challenged in fastening screws at an angle.