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1.) DParker - 07/04/2017
Nothing says, "Up yours, King George!" like exercising your unalienable right to spend a summer day sweating like a pig over a hot smoker/grill. What do you have going on/in your outdoor cooking apparatus today to mark the occasion?

I decided to get all three of the main particpants involved. The U.S. is the star of the show, being represented by two full racks of St. Louis-style pork ribs with homemade rub and some Sweet Baby Ray's on the side. But to acknowledge the part the French played the ribs spent 14 hours in a 165F sous vide bath. They then got sprayed with apple juice, covered in kosher salt and my dry rub and then went into the smoker...also at about 165F...1.5 hours ago with some apple wood pellets. They'll spend another 1.5 hours in there before coming out.

In the spirit of reconciliation I'm also attempting...for the first time ever...Yorkshire pudding. If they turn out, my plan is to strip the meat from the rib bones (which it's already falling off anyway), chop it up, mix it with a little of the BBQ and use it as a filling for the "puddings" (which are basically hollow popovers). If they don't turn out I've advised the wife to have some roasted potatoes standing by as backup starch.
2.) DParker - 07/04/2017
Well, the Yorkshire pudding [i]sorta'[/i] worked. They cooked properly, but the cups in the muffin tin I used kept them from developing enough of a structure to stuff with any decent amount of filling. So I left the ribs intact and just covered the puddings with some shredded cheese.

3.) Swamp Fox - 07/04/2017
You're ambitious with the Yorkshire pudding. Funny you mention it, though. I was reading something last night that made me wonder about the "kidney" part in steak-and-kidney pie.

Tonight I'm saluting the French contribution to American independence--although I think it is overblown--with chicken.

I have given up on trying to crisp the skin, by the way. The only method I tried was dunking in the deep fat fryer, but the results weren't worth the effort. Open to other suggestions.

Tomorrow night I celebrate the Hessian mercenaries with yet another Kasseller [insert umlaut if desired], which I like to think I've become quite good at. Jawohl?

If the Kasseller and Swampy's Succulent Chicken Breasts didn't require two completely different cooking temperatures, it would be fun to throw the Germans in with the French and see what happens.
4.) DParker - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;49798]You're ambitious with the Yorkshire pudding.[/QUOTE]

I thought so at first, but as it turns out...not really. It's just a simple batter of flour, milk, eggs and salt mixed in a blender and poured into a muffin tin that's been pre-heated to 425F. Traditionally each cup in the tin is filled with 1 tsp of beef drippings prior to the preheating, but as I lacked any beef drippings I substituted some of the bacon fat that I always keep on hand...which worked quite well. I'd go so far as to say that Yorkshire pudding is actually pretty hard to screw up.
5.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
I've never tried to make it, but I was under the impression that a lot of people go bananas trying to get it exactly to their liking...Crust, consistency, etc. It's like spoon bread (or cornbread for that matter). It's supposed to be simple, but then people take it to the nth degree, LOL.

Have you thought about trying to do it in a skillet?
6.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
This is what I'm on about...:wink


[B][I][SIZE=3]Yorkshire pudding must be four inches tall, chemists rule[/SIZE][/I][/B]


[url]http://www.rsc.org/AboutUs/News/PressReleases/2008/PerfectYorkshire.asp[/url]
7.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
Official recipe by the Royal Society of Chemistry included at the link above, LOL

[QUOTE]A Yorkshire pudding isn't a Yorkshire pudding if it is less than four inches tall, says the Royal Society of Chemistry.
The Society has ruled on the acceptable dimensions of the Yorkshire pudding and is now issuing the definitive recipe.
The judgement followed an enquiry from an Englishman living in the Rockies in the USA who emailed the RSC seeking scientific advice on the chemistry of the dish following a string of kitchen flops.
Ian Lyness had contacted the RSC to get an explanation for why his attempts at cooking traditional Yorkshire puddings in Colorado had gone flat.
In other parts of the USA Mr Lyness had successfully produced puffy, towering puddings but in the high country he had low results.
The RSC is now checking with fellow scientists to see if cooking the famed dish in a mountain climate would lead to pressure problems.




Chemical scientist and author John Emsley, of Yorkshire, claimed that people not from that county rarely produced worthy Yorkshire puddings.
"It's in the blood and instinct of people born and raised there," said Dr Emsley.
"You can always tell from the look and taste if the cook has the right touch and it is almost pitiful to observe the stuff that comes from some southern ovens - flat, pale and soggy much of the time."
Former Cambridge academic Dr Emsley added: "I have seen many grim results from people who have tried to get their Yorkshires to rise. They frequently made gross errors. After all, cooking is chemistry in the kitchen and one has to have the correct formula, equipment and procedures. To translate the ingredients into chemical terms, these are carbohydrate + H2O + protein + NaCl + lipids."
"Some amateurs even place the batter in the fridge first. What kind of foolish act is that?"




Ian Lyness said from his home in Boulder: "I use batter mix that I pick up on my trips back to Blighty and my mum's old Pyrex dish. Perhaps the secret is to make them as she, as a true Yorkshirewoman, did. I try to follow in her steps. I do not go for the silly little ones on the plate with everything else, but a traditional, big long pudding which she always served as a separate first course with gravy before the roast beef, lamb or whatever. Coleman's English mustard is also essential accompaniment, I find. But I have been struggling badly here. On Sundays from my kitchen window here I can enjoy the sight of rearing snow-capped mountains but on my plate there are apologetic little hillocks."

[/QUOTE]
8.) crookedeye - 07/05/2017
im a first time caller..first time time listner.. im grilling bone in chicken breast, does anyone have a good method???

i'll hang up now and listen to my answers on the air... thanks
9.) bluecat - 07/05/2017
So here's my first Imgur post:




Dug potatoes over the weekend. Made some garlic butter potatoes, green beans from the garden and some steaks on the grill. FU King George!


The potatoes were better than the photograph. Canned 14 quarts so sometime this winter I can enjoy a little sumpin' sumpin'.
10.) bluecat - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=DParker;49796]Nothing says, "Up yours, King George!" like exercising your unalienable right to spend a summer day sweating like a pig over a hot smoker/grill. What do you have going on/in your outdoor cooking apparatus today to mark the occasion?

I decided to get all three of the main particpants involved. The U.S. is the star of the show, being represented by two full racks of St. Louis-style pork ribs with homemade rub and some Sweet Baby Ray's on the side. But to acknowledge the part the French played the ribs spent 14 hours in a 165F sous vide bath. They then got sprayed with apple juice, covered in kosher salt and my dry rub and then went into the smoker...also at about 165F...1.5 hours ago with some apple wood pellets. They'll spend another 1.5 hours in there before coming out.

In the spirit of reconciliation I'm also attempting...for the first time ever...Yorkshire pudding. If they turn out, my plan is to strip the meat from the rib bones (which it's already falling off anyway), chop it up, mix it with a little of the BBQ and use it as a filling for the "puddings" (which are basically hollow popovers). If they don't turn out I've advised the wife to have some roasted potatoes standing by as backup starch.[/QUOTE]

Leave it to DP to combine a history lesson and good eats.
11.) bluecat - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=crookedeye;49804]im a first time caller..first time time listner.. im grilling bone in chicken breast, does anyone have a good method???

i'll hang up now and listen to my answers on the air... thanks[/QUOTE]

Thanks for calling in crookedeye. Our best advice to give you when grilling chicken is to quit picking at it.
12.) crookedeye - 07/05/2017
i marinated some chicken breast a few weeks ago in italian dressing..grilled them and it was tough to grill because it burned easily even on low...but that was the best chicken breast i ever had..

i'll hang up now.
13.) crookedeye - 07/05/2017
do you have any advice on changing springs on a 89 ranger??
14.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=crookedeye;49804]im a first time caller..first time time listner.. im grilling bone in chicken breast, does anyone have a good method???

i'll hang up now and listen to my answers on the air... thanks[/QUOTE]


LOL..Pretty sure no one here knows how to do it. Have you tried over at Eders or Bowsite?
15.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=crookedeye;49809]i marinated some chicken breast a few weeks ago in italian dressing..grilled them and it was tough to grill because it burned easily even on low...but that was the best chicken breast i ever had..

i'll hang up now.[/QUOTE]


If you're doing directly over the heat it takes more experimentation, I think. I cooked chicken over coals for a long time and burned, dried or under-cooked fairly frequently. (Didn't use a meat thermometer.) Since moving the coals off to the side (and investing in a Weber meat probe--$10 at Lowe's, but the cost to my pride was much higher) I'm much better at it.

I do a relatively hot fire. Tried low heat and it didn't work too well.
16.) crookedeye - 07/05/2017
eders?? that place just made me angry..besides im grilling chicken breast and smoked macoroni and cheese..my cheesy enchiladas was a hit last night..all the girls were giving me the eye..
17.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
LOL! That's because they knew it wasn't the dog...
18.) crookedeye - 07/05/2017
when i walked into the door with a tin foil pan of chessy enchiladas..it was like i had a whole bunch of friends, everyone was patting me on the back, telling me how cool i was...
19.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
That used to happen to me, too...LOL
20.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=bluecat;49805]So here's my first Imgur post:


The potatoes were better than the photograph. Canned 14 quarts so sometime this winter I can enjoy a little sumpin' sumpin'.[/QUOTE]


Are you talking about doing something with the juice? Or just enjoying canned potatoes? :-)
21.) DParker - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=bluecat;49805]The potatoes were better than the photograph.[/QUOTE]

I take that to mean that you washed them before cooking (or at least serving) them.

They look good. There's nothing like new potatoes straight from your own dirt.
22.) bluecat - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;49825]Are you talking about doing something with the juice? Or just enjoying canned potatoes? :-)[/QUOTE]

Hadn't thought of that one.

Never canned potatoes before so thought I would give it a try. Being a non-acid food it required pressure canning which is kind of a long process. Forty minutes at 10 pounds of pressure. You have to give it some time to get to pressure before starting the clock and then you have to let it completely exhaust itself before opening the canner. Hopefully, and this is the part that concerned me, the potatoes aren't too overdone. It's an experiment.
23.) bluecat - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=crookedeye;49810]do you have any advice on changing springs on a 89 ranger??[/QUOTE]

24.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=bluecat;49828]Hadn't thought of that one.

Never canned potatoes before so thought I would give it a try. Being a non-acid food it required pressure canning which is kind of a long process. Forty minutes at 10 pounds of pressure. You have to give it some time to get to pressure before starting the clock and then you have to let it completely exhaust itself before opening the canner. Hopefully, and this is the part that concerned me, the potatoes aren't too overdone. It's an experiment.[/QUOTE]

I've never canned anything, but I know you've had some experience. About all I know is that one of the items you have to be extra careful with is potatoes. (Our old buddy botulism.)

Next batch you dig, you should get out the old home brew kit...
25.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=bluecat;49829][/QUOTE]


:laugh:
26.) bluecat - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;49831]I've never canned anything, but I know you've had some experience. About all I know is that one of the items you have to be extra careful with is potatoes. (Our old buddy botulism.)

Next batch you dig, you should get out the old home brew kit...[/QUOTE]

You are right. It is required that you skin the potatoes too, because of botulism. Kind of a bummer cause some of that good flavor is in those skins. The potatoes were Yukon Gold and Red Norland. Wonderful with about anything.

Canning pickles or other items in vinegar doesn't require pressure canning but just water bath canning - a much simpler and less time consuming activity.
27.) bluecat - 07/05/2017
[QUOTE=DParker;49826]I take that to mean that you washed them before cooking (or at least serving) them.

They look good. There's nothing like new potatoes straight from your own dirt.[/QUOTE]

...and about the simplest thing to grow on earth 'cept maybe onions.
28.) Swamp Fox - 07/05/2017
I didn't know you had to skin them before canning; I just assumed you did that for appearance.

I know you can make alcohol from just the skins. I don't know how much that is common knowledge. Just sayin'. :wink

Also, fried potato skins!---Yum!