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1.) DParker - 04/27/2022
No, this isn't about a way to take your gorilla out for a ride (though if he want to go out for a ride you should absolutely take him...or else). This is about the poly dump cart, made by a company named "Gorilla", that I bought months ago for various uses around the property. While this isn't a hunting gear subject, I opted to interpret the "General gear" part of the forum name literally and review something that I though might be of interest to some here. Besides, it's not like the forum is being inundated with posts and we need to keep things on the straight-and-narrow lest we drown in off-topic meanderings. Anywho...

When we moved into the new place I quickly realized that I needed some sort of wheeled conveyance for several types of stuff. For instance hauling the former contents of the chicken coops back to the compost pile after their weekly cleaning, transporting heavy items from point A to point B without wrecking my back, moving dirt away from a freshly dug grav....er...hole, etc. After performing my due diligence on the matter I went with the GCG-12 (12 cu ft capacity) poly dump cart from Gorilla:

[URL="https://gorillamade.com/product/gcg-12/"]https://gorillamade.com/product/gcg-12/[/URL]


This was based on a combination of factors, including the product line's reputation, the value I thought I would get from it, the good price I was able to find it at from a local Tractor Supply store and...not unimportantly...the fact that I was able to find one in stock there (this was when so many things were in even shorter supply than they are now). I've now owned and used the thing for a little over 7 months, and couldn't be more pleased with it. It is solidly built and well designed, with a few particularly well thought-out features. For instance, the handle is held in place with by a linch pin, the removal of which allows the handle to slide up the shaft of the handle. This keeps the handle securely on that shaft while allowing you to use the hole the pin was in, and the pin itself as a way to connect the cart to a Clevis hitch, which I have on the towing attachment for my tractor. I use that combo to haul the cart back to the compost pile in the back pasture whenever the small suburban-type barrel composter I have gets filled up with stuff from the coops and kitchen scraps.

Also, the dumping mechanism is not only ridiculously easy to use, it tips the bucket nearly upside-down, making complete emptying a breeze. And I particularly like the fact that the front wheels have something like a 270 turning arc, which allows you to turn the thing around damned near in-place. Oh, and while I don't anticipate having to replace any of the wheels anytime soon they even made that trivial to accomplish, as they're also held on by linch pins, so you don't even need any tools to replace a wheel. Oh, and there are 8 slots molded into the rim of the bucket to accept braces for increasing capacity, or for hanging tool holders on the side or whatever.

The 16" pneumatic tires make rolling over hard or soft ground about as smoot as could be expected absent a suspension system of some kind, and the wheel base and ground clearance are both more than ample. I've pulled the thing at full speed with my tractor with it not coming even close to tipping over or any other issues.

In short, I really, really like this thing and can't recommend it enough. They have a fairly extensive line of various capacities, materials and general design so there's a very good chance that they have something that fits your purpose...assuming your purpose is to haul stuff around your home rather than any commercial uses (though they have stuff that would be good for some professional needs as well).
2.) DParker - 04/28/2022
OK, I don't know what happened here. I tried to edit my post a couple of times to correct errors, but somehow I ended up with four threads as a result. Unfortunately the forum software doesn't give posters the ability to delete their own threads, so we'll just have to see if Alex notices and deletes the first three. In any event, this is the correct thread to respond to, assuming anyone is so inclined.
3.) Swamp Fox - 04/28/2022
I'm reclined ...

Howdy, pardner! :wave:
4.) Swamp Fox - 04/28/2022
[QUOTE=DParker;66484]OK, I don't know what happened here. [/QUOTE]

Now you no how [B]I[/B] feel ....


LOL
5.) Swamp Fox - 04/28/2022
I don't know if they still make a deer cart, but I'll go looking. I was interested in a bike-compatible model at one point. Will have to see if that was them.

Gorilla made some good tree stands at one or two points. Seems like they crashed and burned, then resurrected, and then crashed and burned again. Liability problems? IDK. That was the rumor, at least the first time.

I had a ton of their hang-on stands in two sizes at one point. Luv'd em!

The carts I've seen at Lowe's have looked very decent. Haven't gone over them with a microscope, though ...

Good review! :applause:
6.) Swamp Fox - 04/28/2022
Naw, I think I was remembering the Hawk [I]Crawler[/I], but I don't see a bike-capability from them these days. Maybe that was a fail on some level, or my faulty memory.

Some enterprising young whipperschnapper might be able to find an old post of mine on here about the subject and help us narrow down the possibilities...
7.) bluecat - 04/28/2022
8.) bluecat - 04/28/2022
We probably purchased our carts about the same time. Looking back I don't know how I lived without one. It is nice to haul mulch, manure, items from beehive to beehive or tree to tree or just have a repository for tools.

When I first started the search I was convinced I wanted metal but the more reviews I read convinced me that metal is just gonna rust.

If I'm going to work on a tree, I can put chainsaw, gas, oil, wedges, rope, water, chainsaw tools, etc. and just bring it along with me. Very nice.
9.) DParker - 04/28/2022
[QUOTE=bluecat;66494]We probably purchased our carts about the same time.[/QUOTE]

Great minds, and all that.

[QUOTE=bluecat;66494]Looking back I don't know how I lived without one. It is nice to haul mulch, manure, items from beehive to beehive or tree to tree or just have a repository for tools.

When I first started the search I was convinced I wanted metal but the more reviews I read convinced me that metal is just gonna rust.[/QUOTE]

Which brings up another point that I forgot to mention in my review: I can see no scratches or chips in the finish on the parts that [I]are[/I] metal, which are unfortunately so common in steel products these days. So that makes me think they're going to last a reasonably long time without rusting, provided I don't damage the finish without noticing and touching it up.

[QUOTE=bluecat;66494]If I'm going to work on a tree, I can put chainsaw, gas, oil, wedges, rope, water, chainsaw tools, etc. and just bring it along with me. Very nice.[/QUOTE]

Yeah, that's another good use for it. I don't have any sort of cargo attachment for the tractor (and decent ones are stupid expensive), so if I need to bring tools with me to the back pasture (there are some dead/dying trees/branches back there I'll need to clean up and use for firewood) I can toss them in the cart and hook it to the tractor.
10.) DParker - 04/28/2022
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;66488]I don't know if they still make a deer cart, but I'll go looking. I was interested in a bike-compatible model at one point. Will have to see if that was them.

Gorilla made some good tree stands at one or two points. Seems like they crashed and burned, then resurrected, and then crashed and burned again. Liability problems? IDK. That was the rumor, at least the first time.

I had a ton of their hang-on stands in two sizes at one point. Luv'd em!

The carts I've seen at Lowe's have looked very decent. Haven't gone over them with a microscope, though ...

Good review! :applause:[/QUOTE]

Thanks. I'm glad you mentioned this because it made me go back over their website, and it looks like they've expanded their product lineup since I first started researching my purchase. They now offer heavy-duty ladders and hose reels. I already have plenty of the former, but need a few of the latter (we have a total of 4 hose bibs outside, and I use them all). Off to do some reading...
11.) bluecat - 04/28/2022
More questions on your drip tape.

I'm thinking that because the water flow is drip, drip, drip, that I don't need to worry so much about water pressure making it to the end of the lines. The system I have now, I can only water in zones because to try and water everything, the pressure just isn't there.

I'm also assuming that this system accept the standard 3/4" hose thread so I can run a standard hose out to the main line and from there I can start the laterals.
12.) DParker - 04/28/2022
[QUOTE=bluecat;66497]More questions on your drip tape.

I'm thinking that because the water flow is drip, drip, drip, that I don't need to worry so much about water pressure making it to the end of the lines. The system I have now, I can only water in zones because to try and water everything, the pressure just isn't there.

I'm also assuming that this system accept the standard 3/4" hose thread so I can run a standard hose out to the main line and from there I can start the laterals.[/QUOTE]

So two things you must have with a drip irrigation system are a filter and a pressure regulator in between your water source (hose or faucet) and your drip main line. Drip system components work at low pressure (generally capped at 25 psi), so unless your water pressure is already that low (or lower) the regulator is a must to keep from blowing things out. The filter is to prevent solid particles from getting into emitters and clogging them up, since they generally have very small orifices (yeah, I said "orifices"). You can implement those separately, but it's far more common to use the 2-in-1 combos that incorporate both functions into a single unit that accepts a hose connection at the input and then a fitting for drip poly main line on the output. One of the surprises I got when I ran 200 ft of hose from the bib on the garage out to where the garden is and put a pressure gauge on the end was that after all that distance I was still getting ~42 psi, which was significantly more than I expected. My original design called for 2 zones that I would switch between, but that proved to be unnecessary because that was more than adequate pressure for the system, which gets knocked down to 25 psi by the regulator anyway. This just means that you water for a lot longer than you would with a conventional watering system. I generally let mine go for about 3.5 hours in order to thoroughly soak the beds to a depth of several inches. As always, YMMV with your particular setup.

There are several good online tutorials on drip irrigation as well as more YT videos than you could stand. Here's just one website that does a good job of explaining things: [URL="https://www.irrigationtutorials.com/drip-irrigation-design-guidelines-basics-of-measurements-parts-and-more/"]https://www.irrigationtutorials.com/drip-irrigation-design-guidelines-basics-of-measurements-parts-and-more/[/URL] Of course there are a lot of options available that won't be covered in any one tutorial, as well as some math you need to do when designing your system. But it's all pretty simple once you understand what's going on.
13.) bluecat - 04/28/2022
Thanks, I never thought about those things. Coming from a well, it would have probably ruptured (I said rupture) something as well as clogging something up. I'll watch those videos and do my research. This all sounds really good. The slow drip deep watering is the recommended and the most efficient way.

Oops, thought I was posting in your retirement thread. I hope that this doesn't turn off all our viewers who were all set to talk about Gorilla carts and share their personal experiences. I hope Jamicka can forgive me.
14.) Swamp Fox - 04/29/2022
[QUOTE=Swamp Fox;66489]Naw, I think I was remembering the Hawk [I]Crawler[/I], but I don't see a bike-capability from them these days. Maybe that was a fail on some level, or my faulty memory.

Some enterprising young whipperschnapper might be able to find an old post of mine on here about the subject and help us narrow down the possibilities...[/QUOTE]

This appears to be a Crawler modified behind an e-bike. I can't blow up the image or examine it very well on my end.

If anyone wants to discuss this with me, please pay the appropriate hijacking toll to DP as OP (Dollars? -- Whiskey? --Female relatives?) -- Or start a separate thread, please.

:tu: